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Recovery

There is no one way to ensure recovery, but we have found that other survivors are a good source of sensible advice. The best medicine to help you get going after your stroke is the hope of recovery. You will notice improvements in what you can do for months, even years, after your stroke.
Did you know?

Approximately 25% of strokes occur in people aged under 65 years.

The Path To Recovery

Our Stroke Support Service has been designed to provide care and advice to help you recover from the trauma of surviving a Stroke. More information is available in our Stroke Support Section.

Use this time to take stock of your life. How quickly you feel yourself improving will depend on many things – including how severe the stroke was and how old you are.

At first you may be aware of any physical problems, such as one-sided paralysis (hemiplegia), speech and communication difficulties, or reduced visual field (how much you can see). You may notice other changes such as emotion, difficulties with concentration and memory, tiredness, talking, laughing or crying for no reason.

Therapists and health workers can work with you to improve recovery and reduce the risk of stroke. You can ask each person to write what they’ll be doing, and what you can expect. Be honest about how much you are following advice.
Remember – you are the person who must put in the effort. Therapists can support you, but the motivation must be yours.

NHS Choices Recovering From Stroke Video

Stroke Patient Handbook

Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundations Trust’s ‘Stroke Patient Handbook’ has been designed to provide general information about Stroke to the patient and their family and it also contains some specific information about who will be involved in the patients’ care. The handbook has been designed for the patient to keep during their Stroke rehabilitation and as a reference to use as and when it is needed. Click here to view

I have recently had a stroke and I need help with...